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How Much Does Prime Rib Cost?

Before we dive into the cost of prime rib, let’s take a brief moment to discuss what it is.

Prime rib is a cut of beef from the rib section of a cow, which is known for its marvelous marbling. This marbling helps to give prime rib its famously delicious flavor and tender, juicy texture.

The dish is notorious for its versatility and is typically cooked bone-in. It can then be served as a whole roast or sliced into individual portions.

But exactly how much does prime rib cost?

Let’s find out…

Factors That Affect the Cost of Prime Rib

There are several factors to consider when it comes to the price of prime rib. Here are a few of the most significant ones:

Grade of Beef

The first thing to consider is the grade of beef, as its grading can significantly impact the price of your prime rib.

USDA Prime is the highest grade of beef, and it is known for its exceptional marbling, unrivaled tenderness, and mouthwatering flavor. USDA Prime cuts are also, therefore, the most expensive option, followed by USDA Choice, with USDA Select being the cheapest.

Grade of Beef

Size of the Roast

The size of the prime rib can also affect how much you will pay. As a general rule, a bigger roast will cost more than a smaller one in the same category. This is because larger roasts usually have more meat in them, which can increase the cost.

Bone-In vs. Boneless

Another factor that can determine the price of your prime rib is whether you prefer it with or without the bones.

Bone-in prime rib usually costs more than its boneless counterpart because the bone adds to the overall weight, making it more expensive per pound.

So Boneless is better?

Many people prefer to pay that extra money for bone-in prime rib because it adds to the flavor and helps to cook the meat evenly. However, if you prefer your prime rib without the bone, you can enjoy more meat per pound. It’s a personal choice.

Location

The cost of prime rib can also vary depending on where you are located. In some areas, prime ribs may be more expensive due to factors such as demand, availability, and transportation costs.

So, what is the actual cost of a good prime rib?

Let me take you through what to expect…

Prime Rib Costs

Now that we have covered the factors that will affect the cost of your local prime rib, let’s take a closer look at the estimated prices you can expect to pay. Here are some rough ideas of prices of prime rib, based on average prices in the United States:

Prime Rib Costs

USDA Prime

Bone-In: $15 to $25 per pound.

Boneless: $25 to $40 per pound.

USDA Choice

Bone-In: $10 to $15 per pound.

Boneless: $15 to $25 per pound.

USDA Select

Bone-In: $8 to $10 per pound.

Boneless: $10 to $15 per pound.

It is worth noting that these prices are only approximate. So, please remember they can vary depending on where you live and the time of year, among many other factors. It’s always a good idea to check with your local butcher or grocery store in advance to check the current prices in your area.

Tips for Buying Prime Rib

If you are in the market for prime rib, here are a few tips to help you get the best deal on this scrumptious dish:

Choose the Right Grade of Beef

As mentioned previously, the grade of beef that you choose can significantly impact the cost of your prime rib. 

If you are on a budget, you could consider opting for USDA Choice or Select beef rather than USDA Prime. While it may not be quite as tender and flavorful, it can still be a delicious and affordable option. 

Choose the Right Grade of Beef

Shop Around

Don’t be afraid to shop around for the best prices available. Be sure to check out a variety of butchers and grocery stores to see who is offering the best deals.

You could also consider buying your prime rib online from one of the many online retailers out there. While this may not be the cheapest option, it can be a convenient way to get high-quality beef delivered straight to your door. Just make sure to check the shipping fees and delivery times before making a purchase.

Buy in Bulk

If you regularly enjoy prime rib or are planning to serve it at an event or large gathering, you could consider buying it in bulk. Many butchers, grocery stores, and supermarkets offer discounts for larger orders.

More meat for less money, what’s not to love?

Look for Sales

Finally, keep an eye out for sales and specials at your local butchers and grocery stores. 

As mentioned earlier, there are a whole host of factors that can impact the cost of beef, so it is always worth checking for bargains. If you time your prime rib purchase just right, you may be able to score a great deal.

Now that we’ve fully answered, what is the cost of prime rib, let’s talk more about…

Prime Rib Matters

We have recently answered a bunch of other questions from our rib-loving readers that may interest you. Like, How many calories is 8 oz of Prime RibHow many calories in a bone in pork ribHow Much Do Beef Short Ribs Cost, and Why are short ribs so high in calories?

And when it comes to the current costs of things…

We also have a lot more to share, such as How Much Does Salmon CostHow Much Does Dry Ice Cost, or How Much Does Deer Processing Cost in 2023?

Holiday coming up, and want to treat yourself or your family to a trip to your favorite prime rib restaurant? We’ve got you covered! Find out fast, what are the RibCrib BBQ Holiday Hours Open & Close and Shane’s Rib Shack Holiday Hours Open & Close?

And if you’re on a budget or paying for a large group, don’t miss our comprehensive guide to the Best Cheap Restaurants for a Group!

Ok, back to…

Final Thoughts

As you should know by now, the cost of prime rib can vary widely depending on several factors, including the grade of beef and the size of the roast. And while it may not be the most budget-friendly option, prime rib is a delicious and versatile cut of meat that is well worth the cost for special occasions. 

However, by shopping around and looking for bargains, you can find a cut of prime rib that fits your budget without sacrificing too much on quality or flavor.

Happy grilling!

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