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What documents do I need to travel with advance parole?

What Documents Do I Need to Travel with Advance Parole?

When planning to travel internationally with advance parole, there are several important documents you need to have in order to ensure a smooth and hassle-free journey. Advance parole is a document issued by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) that allows certain individuals to travel abroad and reenter the United States without jeopardizing their immigration status. Here are the key documents you must have when traveling with advance parole.

1. Advance Parole Document

The most crucial document for traveling with advance parole is, of course, the advance parole document itself. This document serves as authorization for your travel and reentry into the country. It is important to obtain advance parole before your departure to ensure you have legal permission to travel and protect your immigration status.

2. Valid Passport

A valid passport is an essential travel document that is required for international travel. Your passport must be valid for at least six months beyond your planned departure date. It is recommended to check the expiration date well in advance and renew it if necessary. Make sure your passport has blank visa pages for any necessary immigration stamps.

3. Visa, if Required

Depending on your country of origin and the destination, you may need to obtain a visa to enter the country. Research the visa requirements of your destination well in advance and apply for a visa if necessary. Keep in mind that some countries may require additional documentation or specific types of visas, such as tourist or business visas.

4. Supporting Documentation

To enhance the efficacy of your advance parole application, it is recommended to include supporting documentation. This may include evidence of humanitarian reasons for travel, such as medical treatment or attending a family event. Provide any necessary medical records, invitations, or other relevant documents to support your reasons for travel.

5. Proof of Legal Status

To travel with advance parole, you must have valid legal status in the United States. Ensure you have the necessary documents to prove your legal status, such as a valid visa or a green card (permanent resident card). This will be required both for reentry to the United States and during your journey.

6. Itinerary and Travel Plans

Having a well-prepared travel itinerary is important when traveling with advance parole. Include details such as your flight tickets, accommodation arrangements, and any planned activities or appointments during your trip. This will provide clarity to immigration officials and demonstrate that you have organized and purposeful travel plans.

Frequently Asked Questions

1. Can I travel internationally with advance parole?

Yes, advance parole allows you to travel internationally and reenter the United States without jeopardizing your immigration status. However, it is important to have the necessary documents and comply with any relevant travel restrictions.

2. How do I apply for advance parole?

To apply for advance parole, you must complete and submit Form I-131, Application for Travel Document, to USCIS. The form can be filed online or by mail. It is advisable to consult with an immigration attorney to ensure a complete and accurate application.

3. How long does it take to obtain advance parole?

The processing times for advance parole can vary. It typically takes around two to three months to receive a decision on your application. It is recommended to apply well in advance of your intended travel dates.

4. Can I enter any country with advance parole?

No, advance parole does not guarantee entry into any country other than the United States. You must check the entry requirements of your destination country and obtain any necessary visas or permits.

5. Can I travel with advance parole while my green card application is pending?

Yes, if you have a pending green card application, traveling with advance parole is generally allowed. It is crucial to maintain your legal status and comply with all other immigration requirements.

6. Can I travel with advance parole if I have a criminal record?

Traveling with advance parole can be complicated if you have a criminal record. It is advisable to consult with an immigration attorney to determine how your criminal record may affect your ability to travel.

7. Can I travel with advance parole if I have a removal order?

If you have a removal order, traveling with advance parole can be complex. It is crucial to consult with an immigration attorney to understand the potential implications and navigate the process effectively.

8. Can I travel with advance parole while my DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) application is pending?

Yes, individuals with pending DACA applications are generally allowed to travel with advance parole. It is important to consult with an immigration attorney to ensure compliance with all requirements.

9. Can I travel with advance parole multiple times?

Yes, in most cases, you can travel with advance parole multiple times within the validity period of the document. However, ensure you have a valid and unexpired advance parole document before every trip.

10. Can I use advance parole to travel for leisure purposes?

Yes, advance parole can be used for various travel purposes, including leisure or tourism. Ensure you have a valid reason and comply with all relevant travel regulations.

11. Can I work or study while traveling with advance parole?

Advance parole does not provide authorization to work or study abroad. If you plan to engage in employment or educational activities during your travel, you may need to obtain additional permits or visas.

12. What should I do if my advance parole application is denied?

If your advance parole application is denied, it is crucial to consult with an immigration attorney to understand the reasons for the denial and explore alternative options. It may be possible to appeal the decision or explore other forms of travel authorization.

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